Dog & Cat Dentistry

All of our Comprehensive Oral Health Assessment and Treatment (COHAT) procedures include: a physical exam, pre-anesthetic blood work, intravenous catheter and fluids, general anesthesia, a full 12-step cleaning, polishing, and oral exam, along with full mouth digital dental radiographs (xrays). We then call you, and together we determine a treatment plan that suits you, if any further treatment is needed.

It is important to see your dog while he is growing. Spot may have teeth that don’t align properly. This may cause pain or disruption to other teeth in the mouth. He may have been exposed to a virus that disrupted the formation of enamel, leaving his teeth open to infection. There are many changes going on in a growing pet’s mouth that should be evaluated more than once!

Cats are not small dogs! Cats have a different set of teeth than dogs, which require a little different care. Cats are carnivores, which explains why they have fewer molars, and such sharp teeth! They may develop dental issues in their kittenhood which will not resolve without regular care and treatment. Fluffy needs to be seen between her last kitten vaccinations and adulthood to ensure she does not have an early dental problem.

Why is dental care so important? The mouth is the first part of the digestive tract. An animal may not chew  its food properly because its teeth do not meet properly, or because of painful lesions.This leads to problems “further down the line”! Also, accumulation of plaque causes bacteria to circulate throughout the body, and has been linked to liver, heart, and kidney disease. Not to mention tooth loss!

Interesting fact: Cats have a “blood groove” in their canine teeth. This aids in the demise of their prey, and may also help them breathe during this time

Before and After